QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern

Students create four small crayon resist designs that they use to make monotypes. They use the 8 pieces of paper to create a paper quilt. 

Required Time

120 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 1 to Grade 6

Subject

Language Arts
Mathematics
Social Studies
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

colour colour scheme contrasting colour crayon resist line monotype pattern quilt block space

Materials

Crayola® Construction Paper pad - 400 Sheets Crayola® Crayons, Regular 24 ct Crayola® Glue Stick 25 g Crayola® Markers, Fine Line 12 ct - Original Crayola® Watercolour Paint Set - 16 colours Crayola® Paint Brushes Crayola® Marker & Watercolour Paper – 22.9 cm x 30.5 cm cm (9” X 12”) Water Containers Paper Towels Previously Created Book

Steps

QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step One

Step One

  1. Use crayons to draw a design on one of your small squares of paper.
  2. Leave some of the paper white.
  3. Press hard with the crayon.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Paint watercolour over the design.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Before it dries, place the square face down on the larger piece of paper.
  2. Rub it gently with the palm of your hand.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Remove the small square to see your monotype.
  2. Repeat with each of the remaining small squares.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Five

Step Five

  1. Make 8 squares of decorated paper.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Six

Step Six

  1. Decide which papers you would like to use for your quilt.
  2. Design a quilt block using geometric shapes. 
  3. Arrange the shapes on a piece of construction paper or directly on the cardboard cover of your book.
  4. Once you are satisfied with the arrangement start gluing the shapes to the surface.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Seven

Step Seven

  1. Use a fine tip marker to make small stitch marks around the edges of each shape.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Eight

Step Eight

  1. To fasten the quilt to your book cover, apply lots of glue to the back of the construction paper.
  2. Place it on top of the book cover lining up the edges carefully.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Nine

Step Nine

  1. Place a spare paper on top of the quilt.
  2. Gently rub the paper with the palm of your hand.
  3. Make sure the quilt paper is nice and flat.
QUILT BOOK – Printmaking, Colour, Shape, Pattern - Step Ten

Step Ten

  1. Remove the spare paper to view your cover.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  1. Create monotypes using crayon resist technique;
  2. Create a quilt pattern using geometric shapes;
  3. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity; and
  4. Support their ideas with evidence found in the works.

Extensions

Have students:

  1. Research the designs used in the underground railway and use this technique to create an illustrated book of quilts.
  2. Research who in their community makes quilts. Ask them to develop a set of interview questions and then interview and write a story about their quilter. If possible arrange to have them work with the quilter to create a book combining the paper technique and a fabric technique. Share the books at a special gathering of quilters and kids that students organize.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson have students make a book. You may want to use the Making a Sketchbook lesson plan available on this website.
    Making a Sketchbook 
  2. Experiment with the technique and make a sample.
  3. Download some quilt images from the Internet, for example,
    Child's 
    Colourful
    Quilt
    Charlestown
  4. Cut the paper into 10 cm (4") squares.

Introduction

  1. Display the images of quilts.
  2. Discuss how these artworks are different than other kinds of art they are familiar with.
  3. Notice the different patterns used in each work.
  4. Talk about what is interesting about each piece, and compare them, for example,
    - use of colour
    - use of repetition
    - how the design fills the space
    - how these quilts compare to any the students may have
  5. Make sure students support their ideas with evidence found in the work. The VTS (Visual Thinking Strategies) approach uses an effective question that guides students to be precise in their thinking.  What do you see that makes you say that?
    VTS
  6. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Create monotypes using crayon resist technique.
  2. Create a quilt pattern using geometric shapes.
  3. Use the quilt to decorate the cover of your book.
  4. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.
  5. Support your ideas with evidence found in the work.

The Process

  1. Ensure that everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    - 8 pieces of decorated paper
    - contrasting colours
    - geometric shapes
    - shapes fill the page
    - stitch marks carefully drawn
    - cover is flat
    - paper in good condition
  3. Place students into small groups.
  4. Demonstrate how to make the crayon resist and monotype.
  5. Show them that the prints may not be perfect, but that won’t matter because they will be able to use some of the decorated paper and the colours and design with go nicely with the original resist.
  6. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  7. Encourage students to trade some of their papers just as quilters trade fabrics.
  8. Encourage students to play with the arrangement of their shapes before gluing them down.
  9. Observe students as they work.
  10. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Have students place their books on their desks.
  2. Provide sticky notes at each group.
  3. Ask students to walk around the room and view all the books.
  4. Ask them to choose 3 books to write a comment about.
    Write what you like or find interesting about the book and why.  
    Sign your name on the sticky note.
    If a book already has 3 sticky notes choose another book to comment on until all books have at least 3 comments.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work  – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting
  2. Observe students as they view the art works – respectful, serious, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads - QUILT.BOOK.tracking.sheet.pdf)
  3. Read the comments students wrote about the books.
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads - QUILT.BOOK.Self-Assessment.pdf)