PRINTMAKING – Types of Prints

This is a brief overview of printmaking types and terms.

Required Time

0 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 1 to Grade 12

Subject

Art Techniques
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

edition of prints inking plate monotype overprint print printing plate proof pull a print relief print seal stencil

Materials

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Steps

What to Do

Relief Prints are made by inking a raised surface and pressing that surface onto another surface such as paper. See the lesson plan on this website at the following link,
       A World Without

  1. Stamps can be used to create gift bags and matching cards. Use soft craft foam glued to plastic jug lids or small pieces of scrap wood for the stamp, and Crayola washable markers for the ink.
  2. Draw into a styrofoam meat tray using a ballpoint pen to create a linear printing plate. Ink using washable markers or Crayola washable paint.
  3. A printing plate can be created by gluing string to cardboard. Once glue is dry the surface of the plate should be coated with a polymer medium to make it waterproof.
  4. A printing plate can be created by gluing cardboard to cardboard. Once glue is dry the surface of the plate should be coated with a polymer medium to make it waterproof.

An Edition of Prints means that every print in the set of prints made looks the same. It is challenging  for students to attempt to make an edition of prints.

  1. Editions are numbered and signed in pencil.
  2. Prints are numbered by showing 2 numbers separated by a slash.
  3. The first number represents the order that the print was made, e.g., first print is #1, second #2 etc.
  4. The second number represents the total number of prints in the edition, e.g., 4 or 6.
  5. An edition of 4 prints is numbered  1/4, 2/4, 3/4, 4/4
  6. Usually the number is written in the lower left corner. The title of the print goes in the middle of the space and the artist’s name in the right corner. For example, an edition of 3 prints is signed:

                                                   1/3                     On It's Last Legs               E.Sanders

Monotype printmaking is a process that results in only one print rather than many. Paint is applied to a smooth surface and then a piece of paper is pressed onto it, gently rubbed and removed thus transferring the image to the paper.

  1. Create patterns that suggest different textures using cardboard scrapers. Roll Crayola Finger Paint or washable paint over a flat surface. Divide the paint into sections and then make a different pattern in each section. Place a sheet of paper over the image, and gently rub the paper with your hand.
  2. Monotypes can also be created by painting a picture with washable paint on a flat surface such as a tabletop, plastic covered cardboard, cookie tray, or piece of Plexiglas. Once the image has been created place a sheet of paper over it, and gently rub the paper with your hand.
  3. Monotypes can be created on top of shaving cream using Crayola watercolours. Paper is placed over the image, removed and the foam is scraped off the paper to reveal a print.

Stencil Prints are created by applying ink or paint through or around a cutout design. See the lesson plan on this website at the following link,
      Stencil a Poem


Washable Markers, Crayons, Oil Pastels, Washable Paint, Slick Stix and Finger Paint can all be used to create interesting designs with stencils. Paint can be daubed on with a stencil brush, small sponge or splattered with a toothbrush. Washable marker can be applied to the outer edge of the stencil and then rubbed into the opening with a damp sponge or wet paintbrush. Crayon and oil pastel can be coloured on or rubbed into place. Encourage students to experiment with techniques to get a wide variety of results.