POLYGON SHAPES DESIGN – Colour, Transparency, Shape

Students create a design using a variety of overlapping, regular polygon shapes, choose a specific colour scheme and use coloured pencils to apply colours so that they create the illusion of transparency;

 

Required Time

80 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 6 to Grade 9

Subject

Language Arts
Mathematics
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

balance colour movement polygon shape transparent

Materials

Crayola Marker & Watercolour Paper - 22.9 cm x 30.5 cm (9" x 12") Crayola Coloured Pencils Crayola Fine Line Markers Pencils Rulers Erasers

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Steps

POLYGON SHAPES DESIGN –  Colour, Transparency, Shape - Step One

Step One

  1. Cut out the polygon tracers. (Downloads - PolygonTracers.pdf)
  2. Place a tracer on your paper.
  3. Mark each vertex.
POLYGON SHAPES DESIGN –  Colour, Transparency, Shape - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Connect the dots of each vertex to create the polygon.
  2. Try extending the connecting lines to add interest to your design
  3. Use different polygons.
  4. Overlap the shapes.
  5. From time to time view your design from a distance.
    - Is the design balanced?
    - Does it move your eye through the picture plane?
POLYGON SHAPES DESIGN –  Colour, Transparency, Shape - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Redraw the lines and dots with a fine line marker.
  2. Choose a colour scheme. (Colour Wheel Poster)
    - Complementary - Uses colours on opposite sides of the colour wheel.
    - Analogous - Uses colours that are next to each other on the colour wheel.
    - Triadic - Uses 3 colours that are evenly spaced on the colour wheel.
  3. Colour your design using the colours you have chosen.
  4. Blend the colours where the shapes overlap.
POLYGON SHAPES DESIGN –  Colour, Transparency, Shape - Step Four

Step Four

  1. View your design with fresh eyes.
    - Do the shapes look transparent? Why?
    - Do some shapes seem to be on top of other shapes? 
    - What do you see that makes you say that?
    - Does your eye move through the picture plane? How?
    - What do you like best about your design? Why?

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • create a design using a variety of regualr polygon shapes;
  • identify and use a specific colour scheme;
  • use colour to create the illusion of transparency;
  • arrange shapes and colours to create a balanced composition; 
  • arrange shapes and colours to move the eye through the picture plane;
  • demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

Extensions

Have students:

  • create platonic solids using construction paper;
  • use the solids to create a sculpture that complements their design;
  • work in small groups to arrange their sculptures and designs in a group show;
  • create a pamphlet explaining the artworks to accompany their show;
  • invite others to view and comment on their show.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson teach about regular polygons and their properties.
    - triangle; square; pentagon; hexagon; heptagon; octagon.
  2. Download and make copies of the polygon shapes tracers - 1 per student. (Downloads - PolygonShapesTracers.pdf)
  3. Download and display the Colour, Balance and Movement posters available on this website.
  4. Teach or review colour schemes,
    - Complementary - uses colours opposite each other on the colour wheel, e.g., blue and orange.
    - Analogous - uses colours next to each other on the colour wheel, e.g., yellow-green, yellow and yellow-orange.
    - Triadic - uses 3 colours which are evenly spaced on the colour wheel, e.g., yellow, blue and red.
  5. Teach or review the principles of balance and movement.
    - Balance - the arrangement of elements so that they seem equal in weight or importance.
    - Movement - the arrangement of elements so that they move the eye throughout the artwork.
  6. Create an example of 2 overlapping shapes coloured to appear transparent.
    - one shape is blue
    - one shape orange
    - the new shape created by the overlap is a blend of the orange and blue of the 2 original shapes

Introduction

  1. View and discuss the transparency example.
  2. Demonstrate how to layer one colour over the other so they blend together. 
    - start slowly and gradually build up several layers of colour using fairly light pressure
    - grip the pencil farther from its base to allow for lighter strokes
    - create light circular strokes at first
    - switch to horizontal strokes
    - change the direction of your initial strokes
  3. Introduce the challenge.
     

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Create a design using a variety of regualr polygon shapes.
  2. Identify and use a specific colour scheme.
  3. Use colour to create the illusion of transparency.
  4. Arrange shapes and colours so they create a balanced composition.
  5. Arrange shapes and colours so they move the eye through the picture plane;
  6. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    I know I am successful when I have:
    - created a design using polygon shapes
    - chosen a colour scheme
    - layered colour to create the illusion of transparency
    - created a balanced composition
    - arranged shapes and colours so they move the eye through the picture plane 
    - kept the paper in good condition
  3. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  4. Observe students as they work. 
  5. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Display the designs as abody of work
  2. Ask students to view the designs and comment on one that interests them.
    - Do the shapes look transparent? Why?
    - Do some shapes seem to be on top of other shapes? 
    - What do you see that makes you say that?
    - Does your eye move through the picture plane? How?
    - What do you like best about this design? Why?
  3. Ask students how they felt aboout doing this project and why.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting.
  2. Observe students as they discuss their designs – speaks with a clear voice, looks at audience while speaking, points to areas in the design, provides accurate information, answers questions from the audience effectively.
  3. Observe students as they listen – looks at presenter, asks effective questions, supports ideas with evidence found in the artwork.
  4. Use a checklist to track progress. (Download - Design_tracking.pdf)
  5. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads - Design_self-assessment.pdf)