PICTURE A PROJECT – Working With Dry Erase Water Soluble Crayons

Students explore Dry Erase water soluble crayons and use them to create a drawing of a significant project they have completed.

Required Time

80 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 1 to Grade 8

Subject

Language Arts
Science
Social Studies
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

balance colour movement overlapping texture value

Materials

Water Soluble Crayons (Dry Erase Crayons) Sketchbooks Pencils Plastic Placemat Green Masking Tape Watercolour Paper 22.9 cm x 30.5 cm (9"x 12")

Steps

PICTURE A PROJECT – Working With Dry Erase Water Soluble Crayons - Step One

Step One

  1. Experiment with ways to use the crayons.
    - dip the crayon into the water and then draw with it
    - paint water onto the tip of a crayon and then paint the colour onto the paper
PICTURE A PROJECT – Working With Dry Erase Water Soluble Crayons - Step Two

Step Two

colour crayon directly on the paper and then brush water into it

PICTURE A PROJECT – Working With Dry Erase Water Soluble Crayons - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Make a plan drawing.
    - include important details
    - make sure the composition is balanced
    - place shapes and lines so they move your eye through the picture plane
PICTURE A PROJECT – Working With Dry Erase Water Soluble Crayons - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Tape a piece of watercolour paper to a plastic placemat.
  2. Be sure to use one long strip of tape for each side.
  3. Lightly draw your composition on the paper with a pencil.
  4. Begin by colouring directly on the paper with the water soluble crayons.
PICTURE A PROJECT – Working With Dry Erase Water Soluble Crayons - Step Five

Step Five

  1. Paint water into the crayon to create different values.
PICTURE A PROJECT – Working With Dry Erase Water Soluble Crayons - Step Six

Step Six

  1. When you are satisfied with your work, gently remove the tape from the paper.
PICTURE A PROJECT – Working With Dry Erase Water Soluble Crayons - Step Seven

Step Seven

  1. View your picture with fresh eyes.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • use Dry Erase water soluble crayons to create a drawing of a signifcant project;
  • use placement of shapes and colours to create movement and balance;
  • use overlapping shapes to make their drawing seem 3-dimensional;
  • demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity;
  • support their ideas with evidence found in the artworks.

Extensions

Have students:

  • experiment with the Dry Erase water soluble crayons on different surfaces, including plastic, to see what kinds of effects they can achieve;
  • work with a small group to create a layered artwork that combines a variety of papers and plastic surfaces;
  • find quotes and phrases that connect with their artwork;
  • design a quiz to accompany their artwork;
  • display the artwork, text and quiz and ask peers to contribute their responses on sticky notes as part of the display.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson have students complete a significant project, for example,
    - building a model of a catapult, tall tower or bridge
    - designing and building an outdoor bee garden
    - creating a model village of an ancient civilization
  2. Download and display the Movement and Balance posters available on this website.
    - review or teach the principles of movement and balance – placement of shapes
  3. Provide time for students to practice drawing the project, or parts of it from different points of view.
  4. Gather plastic placemats - one for each student.
  5. Gather the required art materials and place them in baskets for easy distribution.

Introduction

  1. Have students work in small groups.
  2. Invite them to take turns sharing their sketches and discussing the things that are important to them about their project.
  3. Once they have finished ask for a few volunteers to share something about their project.
  4. Discuss how a drawing can communicate visual information to the viewer. Focus on things to include, for example,
    - specific details related to the project - size, proportions, textures, shapes
    - placement on the page - positive and negative space
    - placement of shapes to move the viewer's eye through the picture plane
    - balance
  5. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Use Dry Erase water soluble crayons to create a drawing of your project.
  2. Use placement of shapes and colours to create movement and balance.
  3. Use overlapping shapes to make your drawing seem 3-dimensional.
  4. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.
  5. Support your ideas with evidence found in the artworks.

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students. For example,
    I know I am successful when I have:
    - created a water soluble crayon drawing;
    - included details that communicate visual information about my project;
    - used overlapping shapes to make the drawing seem 3-dimensional;
    - placed shapes and colours to 
    move the viewer's eye through the picture plane;
    - placed elements to create a balanced composition;
    - created different values and textures with water soluble crayons;
    - kept the paper in good condition.
  3. Encourage students to think about how they can use colours, lines and symbols to communicate their ideas.
  4. Discuss how the placement of objects in a design can create areas of interest and emphasis that move the viewer's eye through the picture plane. 
  5. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  6. Observe students as they work. 
  7. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Display the drawings as a ‘body of work’.
  2. Ask students to gather in front of the display and look at the works thoughtfully.
  3. Ask them to find 3 things they find interesting about any of them.
  4. During the discussion include references to:
    - composition - how the placement of elements on the paper moves the viewer's eye through the picture plane
    - details - things that provide visual information about the project

    value and texture - how water has been used to create different values and textures
    - overlapping shapes - how overlapping shapes creates the illusion of depth 
    feelings the works evoke
    challenges they may have had and how they solved them
  5. Ask them to tell how they felt about doing this project.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting
  2. Observe students as they discuss the drawings – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience.
  3. Use a checklist to track progress. (Download - Picture_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads - Picture_self-assessment.pdf)