PATTERN SCULPTURE – Inspired By The OCAD Building

Students use a variety of papers and drawing tools to create a pattern-filled, free-standing sculpture that is inspired by OCAD University's Sharp Centre for Design.

Required Time

120 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 3 to Grade 9

Subject

Language Arts
Mathematics
Science
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

angle balance movement pattern sculpture space

Materials

Crayola Oil Pastels Crayola Coloured Pencils Crayola Watercolour Paints Crayola Paint Brushes Crayola Regular Crayons Crayola Scissors Crayola White Glue Crayola Glue Sticks Crayola Construction Paper - 22.9 cm x 30.5 cm (9" x 12") Cardstock Paper - 21.^ cm x 27.9 cm (8.5" x 11") Rulers Water Containers Paper Towels Scrap Pieces of Corrugated Cardboard

Shop Crayola Products

Steps

PATTERN SCULPTURE – Inspired By The OCAD Building - Step One

Step One

  1. Use a 21.6 cm x 27.9 cm (8.5" x 11") piece of cardstock paper. 
  2. Use crayons or coloured pencils to fill the paper with lots of different patterns.
PATTERN SCULPTURE – Inspired By The OCAD Building - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Use watercolours to paint over the whole design.
PATTERN SCULPTURE – Inspired By The OCAD Building - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Use the Small Box With A Lid worksheet. (Downloads - SmallBox.pdf)
  2. Follow the instructions to make the bottom of a box.
PATTERN SCULPTURE – Inspired By The OCAD Building - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Use paint and/or oil pastels to draw patterns on strips of construction paper.
    - make the strips of paper different widths
    - vary the colours and designs
    - make at least 6 different strips
PATTERN SCULPTURE – Inspired By The OCAD Building - Step Five

Step Five

  1. Accordion fold the paper strips.
  2. Make some folds deeper than others.
  3. Fill the box with the folded paper strips.
    - play with the space to make interesting shadows
    - change the direction of the strips
    - place some strips over other strips
    - be aware of how your eyes move from one pattern to another inside the box
PATTERN SCULPTURE – Inspired By The OCAD Building - Step Six

Step Six

  1. Roll at least 4 paper rods to support your box.
    - place a piece of construction paper flat on your desk and at a 45° angle to the edge of your desk
    - place a pencil on one corner of the paper so that it is parallel to the edge of your desk
    - slowly begin to roll the paper around the pencil keeping it fairly tight
    - when you are almost at the end put a small amount of glue on the tip of the paper, then finish rolling the paper
    - press the glued tip against the rolled paper to hold it in place
    - remove the pencil
PATTERN SCULPTURE – Inspired By The OCAD Building - Step Seven

Step Seven

  1. Use the rods to support your pattern box in an interesting way.
  2. Make sure the sculpture is balanced and sturdy.
  3. View the sculpture from all sides.
  4. Give the sculpture a title.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • follow instructions to create a small box;
  • create a variety of patterns in and on the box;
  • use the box as part of a three-dimensional, free-standing sculpture inspired by OCAD University's Sharp Centre for Design;
  • use angles and spaces to create visual movement;
  • demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity;
  • support their ideas with evidence found in the works. 

Extensions

Have students:

  • use a device to take pictures of themselves and their friends in various poses that will look as if they are in or on their sculptures;
  • edit and print the photos so they are small enough to fit the proportions of their sculptures;
  • cut out the photos and glue them to the sculptures so that they fit the space in an interesting way.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson you may want to have students explore stability and structures using the Paper Rod Sculpture lesson plan available on this website.
  2. Review and practice making patterns with a variety of materials.
  3. Download and display the Balance and Movement posters available on this website.
  4. Review or teach the principles of balance and movement – asymmetry, placement of shapes
  5. Download pictures of free-standing structures from the Internet, for example,
    Bell Tower
    Life Guard Tower
    Tower
  6. Download pictures of OCAD University's Sharp Centre for Design.
    OCAD
    OCAD From Below
  7. Print the Small Box With A Lid worksheet - enough for pairs of students to share. (Downloads - SmallBox.pdf)
  8. Read the Designlines article Will Alsop on 10 Years of the Sharp Centre for Design

Introduction

  1. View pictures of different kinds of functional tower structures and lead students in a discussion about what factors contribute to their stability.
  2. List their ideas on chart paper.
  3. View and discuss images of the Sharp Centre for Design. Ask students:
    - How does the design reflect the purpose of the building?
    - How is the building like a sculpture?
    - What effect does pattern and colour have on the overall design of the building?
  4. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Follow instructions to create a small box.
  2. Create a variety of patterns in and on the box.
  3. Use the box as part of a three-dimensional, free-standing sculpture inspired by OCAD University's Sharp Centre for Design.
  4. Use angles and spaces to create visual movement.
  5. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.
  6. Support your ideas with evidence found in the works. 

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students. For example,
    I know I am successful when I have:
    - created a free-standing sculpture
    - created many different patterns
    - followed instructions accurately to create a box
    - rolled sturdy paper rods
    - included many different angles and spaces
    - kept the sculpture in good condition
  3. Encourage students to build thoughtfully, periodically looking at their design from a distance.
  4. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  5. Observe students as they work. 
  6. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Place students into groups of about 6.
  2. Ask them to discuss their sculptures and compare the way they are made. 
    - What do you notice about how students balanced their sculptures?
    - How do the angles and spaces create visual movement through the works?
    - How does colour and placement affect the overall impression of the work?
    - How are the sculptures like the Sharp Centre for Design building? How are they different?
  3. After the small group discussions, ask students to share something of interest from their group with the whole class.
  4. Ask students how they felt about making this sculpture.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting.
  2. Observe students as they discuss the sculptures – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience.
  3. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads - PatternSculpture_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads - PatternSculpture_self-assessment.pdf, or PatternSculpturePrimary_self-assessment.pdf))