PACKAGING MATERIAL BUDDY – Sculpture, Space, Balance

Students learn how to join three-dimensional objects as they create an imaginary buddy using various shaped Styrofoam packaging materials, coloured glue, markers, crayons and a variety of 3-dimensional objects.

Required Time

40 Minutes

Grade Level

Kindergarten to Grade 3

Subject

Language Arts
Science
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

balance form sculpture shape

Materials

White Glue Coloured Glue Markers Crayons Glitter Glue Scissors Styrofoam Packaging Material Toothpicks Foam Sticks Corks Wooden Stir Sticks Pipe Cleaners

Steps

PACKAGING MATERIAL BUDDY – Sculpture, Space, Balance - Step One

Step One

  1. Choose a Styrofoam shape for the main part of your buddy sculpture.
  2. Draw on it using markers and crayons.
  3. Think of all the things you can use to make your buddy interesting.
PACKAGING MATERIAL BUDDY – Sculpture, Space, Balance - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Wrap a pipe cleaner around a pencil or the handle of a paint brush. 
  2. Pull it off gently so it stays curled. 
  3. Stick the twisted pipe cleaner into the Styrofoam.
PACKAGING MATERIAL BUDDY – Sculpture, Space, Balance - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Paint coloured glue on parts of the shape.
PACKAGING MATERIAL BUDDY – Sculpture, Space, Balance - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Stick a toothpick into the Styrofoam.
  2. Add some beads.
  3. Place a drop of glue on top of the last bead to hold it in place.
PACKAGING MATERIAL BUDDY – Sculpture, Space, Balance - Step Five

Step Five

  1. Gently insert a toothpick into the end of a foam stick.
  2. Leave about half the toothpick sticking out.
  3. Insert the toothpick into the Styrofoam.
PACKAGING MATERIAL BUDDY – Sculpture, Space, Balance - Step Six

Step Six

  1. Join other objects to the Styrofoam using toothpicks and glue.
  2. Keep adding details to make every part of your buddy sculpture interesting.
  3. Give your buddy sculpture a name.
  4. Look at your buddy sculpture from all sides.
    - What kinds of shapes do you see?
    - What kind of energy do you feel from the details in your sculpture?

    ​- What do you see that makes you say that?
    What do you like the best about this sculpture? Why?
    Who would love this sculpture? Why?
  5. Find shape words in the classroom.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • create a free-standing sculpture;
  • create personal responses to the centre materials;
  • work independently and self-regulate;
  • share their ideas with peers; 
  • demonstrate a sense of accomplishment.

Extensions

  1. Set up a centre in your room where students can examine a variety of products and their packaging materials, such as cardboard boxes, Styrofoam, bubble wrap, plastic forms.
  2. ​Have students:
    - sort and classify the packaging materials;
    - weigh and measure the packaging materials;
    - explain what the packaging materials do;
    - design ways to package objects using the least amount of packaging material;

    - explain why it is beneficial to reduce packaging materials;
    - share their ideas with their peers.

Prepare

  1. Create a sculpture centre in your classroom with the following things:
    - various Styrofoam packaging materials
    - washable white and coloured glue
    - paint brushes
    - scissors
    - markers and crayons
    - pencils
    - toothpicks
    - pipe cleaners
    - foam sticks
    - corks
    - buttons
    - wooden stir sticks
    - beads
    - glitter glue
  2. Gather, and make available, books about recycling, for example, Why Should I Recycle?, by Jen Green, and Mike Gordon; The Adventures of a Plastic Bottle: A Story About Recycling, by Alison Inches, and Pete Whitehead; Don't Throw That Away!: A Lift-the-Flap Book about Recycling and Reusing, by Lara Bergen, and Betsy Snyder; The Adventures Of An Aluminum Can, by Alison Inches; The Three R's: Reuse, Reduce, Recycle, by Nuria Roca, Rosa M. Curto; and Where Does the Garbage Go?, by Paul Showers, and Randy Chewning.
  3. Download and display the ShapeForm and Balance posters available on this website.
     

Introduction

  1. ​Conduct a read-aloud with a book such as Don't Throw That Away!: A Lift-the-Flap Book about Recycling and Reusing, by Lara Bergen, and Betsy Snyder.
  2. View and discuss a variety of pieces of Styrofoam packaging material pointing out the difference between 2-and 3- dimensional shapes, and guessing what kind of product was packed in the Styrofoam.
  3. Display shape words in the classroom.
  4. Introduce the sculpture centre and explain what a sculpture is – a 3-dimensional artwork that can be viewed from all sides.
  5. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Make a buddy sculpture using Styrofoam packaging material.
  2. Use your own ideas to make your buddy sculpture.
  3. Use different materials to make all sides of your buddy sculpture interesting.
  4. Explain how you made your buddy sculpture.

The Process

  1. Ensure that students understand the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    I know I am successful when I:
    - use my own ideas to make my buddy sculpture
    - add a variety of objects to my buddy sculpture
    - make all sides of my buddy sculpture interesting
    - explain how I made my buddy sculpture
    - share my ideas with my classmates
  3. Guide students through the steps outlined in the lesson plan.
  4. Demonstrate how to use a toothpick to join objects.
  5. Demonstrate how to make a twisted pipe cleaner.
  6. Observe students as they work.
  7. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Gather students to share and discuss their sculptures. Ask students:
    What kinds of shapes do you see?
    - What kind of energy do you feel from the details in your sculpture?

    ​- What do you see that makes you say that?
    What do you like the best about this sculpture? Why?
    Who would love this sculpture? Why?
  2. Display all the sculptures in the classroom.
  3. Encourage students to view the sculptures and notice how they are the same, and how they are different.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting.
  2. Observe students as they discuss the artworks – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience.
  3. Use a checklist to track progress. (Download - Buddy_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have grade 1- 3 students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Download - Buddy_self-assessment.pdf)