MY FAVOURITE THINGS – Art in the Style of Eric Carle

Students use paints to create a variety of textured papers and use them to create a narrative collage in the style of Eric Carle.

Required Time

120 Minutes

Grade Level

Kindergarten to Grade 6

Subject

Art Techniques
Language Arts
Social Studies
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

collage primary colours secondary colours shape texture

Materials

Crayola Marker and Watercolour Paper Variety of texture making tools Glue Sticks Scissors

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Steps

MY FAVOURITE THINGS – Art in the Style of Eric Carle - Step One

Step One

Use a variety of chosen object to create textures on your paper with paint.

MY FAVOURITE THINGS – Art in the Style of Eric Carle - Step Two

Step Two

Create a variety of colours and textures on the papers.  Use the tools in lots of different ways to see what happens.

MY FAVOURITE THINGS – Art in the Style of Eric Carle - Step Three

Step Three

For example, what happens when you drag a comb through the paint?

MY FAVOURITE THINGS – Art in the Style of Eric Carle - Step Four

Step Four

Make lots of different textured papers.

MY FAVOURITE THINGS – Art in the Style of Eric Carle - Step Five

Step Five

Use watercolour paints to cover a sheet of paper. This will be the background for your collage.

MY FAVOURITE THINGS – Art in the Style of Eric Carle - Step Six

Step Six

Choose colours and textures from the papers you created. Cut out different shapes to create your picture. Carefully glue them into place on the painted paper. Repeat colours and patterns to create areas of interest.

MY FAVOURITE THINGS – Art in the Style of Eric Carle - Step Seven

Step Seven

Use construction paper as a background for a different look. Overlap shapes and make similar things different sizes to add interest and variety to the picture.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  1. Create a narrative collage in the style of Eric Carle;
  2. Create a variety of textured papers using paint techniques;
  3. Use the placement of objects to create one or more areas of interest;
  4. Create and select colours and textures to depict each object;
  5. Demonstrate planning ability, technical accomplishment and creativity; and
  6. Support their ideas with evidence found in the artwork.

Extensions

  1. Have students write the story that their picture tells using their own words.
  2. Use this collage technique in other applications such as showing one of the four seasons or telling a different story.
  3. Research other artists who have used similar techniques.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson teach students about real and implied textures and look at a variety of artworks that employ one or both.
  2. Lead students on a texture walk in the classroom. Challenge them to make rubbings of many different textures, including walls, floors, shoes, clothing etc. Share and discuss finished rubbings.
  3. Generate and display a list of texture words.
  4. Encourage students to do a texture walk at home and bring examples into class for discussion.
  5. Have students create their own colour wheels of primary and secondary colours, mixing the secondary colours from the primaries.
  6. Show students a variety of artworks that demonstrate strong areas of emphasis.
  7. Discuss how having a strong focal point or area of emphasis helps lead the eye through a work of art.
  8. Download Eric Carle videos.
    Favourites
    Caterpillar
  9. Collect objects to paint textures.

Introduction

  1. Read several Eric Carle books and make them available for students to read independently.
  2. Lead a discussion about the techniques used by Eric Carle to achieve a wide variety of textures in his artworks.
  3. Discuss some of the compositions used by Eric Carle in relation to the development of the main character.
  4. Show the Eric Carle video about his favourite things.
  5. Ask children to think about their favourite things. What is their favourite:
    - activity
    - colour
    - animal
    - food
    - time of day
    - thing
  6. Explain that they are going to make a picture that tells a story about their favourite things. 
     

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Create a narrative painting in the style of Eric Carle.
  2. Create a variety of textured papers using paint techniques.
  3. Use the placement of objects to create one or more areas of interest.
  4. Create colours and textures to depict each object.
  5. Demonstrate planning ability, technical accomplishment and creativity.
  6. Support your ideas with evidence found in the artwork.

The Process

  1. Have students plan and draw the picture they will create. 
  2. Remind them that this picture is meant to be a narrative. It has to tell a story.
  3. Have students discuss their plans with a partner (think, pair, share) or in a small group. 
  4. Challenge them to imagine their finished picture and generate a list of colours and textures that will help to make their finished work effective, e.g., My picture will have grass in it so I need to create a green finger painting. To get the texture of grass I will pull a comb through my paint while it is wet.
  5. Review the importance of having a focal point or area of emphasis.
  6. Encourage students to think of the kinds of details they will need to add to their composition to make an effective story.
  7. Make sure everyone understands the challenge
  8. Encourage students to refer to pictures by Eric Carle for inspiration
  9. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  10. Observe students as they work. 
  11. Provide individual assistance and encouragement

Sharing

  1. Once the artworks are complete, display pictures at eye level and have the class take a gallery walk. Remind students of the challenge.​​
  2. Ask students to walk silently, thinking about a picture they are drawn to because it exemplifies one or more of the learning goals.
  3. After the gallery walk gather the class and invite students to share positive comments about their chosen work using language from the learning goals. Model what you mean first. For example, I notice how John used a lot of blue in his picture to show the sea. The texture looks like water because of the way he used his fingers to go up and down and make wavy marks. His orange sailboat stands out against the blue water. That creates an area of interest for me.
  4. Ask children to tell what they think the favourite things are for a picture and to tell why. For example, I think his favourite colour is blue because there is a lot of blue in the picture, and it looks like he likes to go sailing. Probably blue reminds him of sailing.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking clarification or more information, elaborating, experimenting.
  2. Observe students as they discuss their peers' artworks – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience.
  3. Use a checklist to track progress. (Attachment - CARLE_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Attachment - CARLE_self-assessment.pdf)
    and for Grade 1 (Attachment - GR1_COLLAGE_self-assessment.pdf)