MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour

Students use white glue, watercolour paint and coloured pencils to create a landscape painting. They use the Canadian Group of Seven as inspiration for their own original work.

Required Time

180 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 7 to Grade 10

Subject

Social Studies
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

background cool colours foreground line middle ground texture warm colours

Materials

Crayola® Marker & Watercolour Paper – 22.9 cm x 30.5 cm cm (9” X 12”) Watercolour Paints Coloured Pencils White Glue

Steps

MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step One

Step One

Select several photos to work with. Practice drawing the images in your sketchbook or on paper. Choose one sketch to use for your painting.

MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Two

Step Two

Use your chosen sketch as a guide and draw the trees, hills and bushes with Crayola Project Glue. 

MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Three

Step Three

Allow the glue to dry overnight.

MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Four

Step Four

Use warm and cool colours of watercolour paint to fill in the land and sky. Use complementary colours, for example, blue and orange. Once the paint is dry, use coloured pencils to add detail to the landscape. Choose a variety of each colour, for example, light, medium and dark blues.

MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Five

Step Five

Mix at least three analogous colours in each section to achieve rich textures.

MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Six

Step Six

Add emphasis by using contrast and bold strokes of colour.

Learning Goals

     Students will be able to:

  1. Identify characterisitics of the works of the Group of Seven;
  2. Draw a landscape that expresses their own ideas in the style of the Group of Seven;
  3. Draw with glue to create texture and line;
  4. Use contrast and bold strokes of colour to create areas of emphasis;
  5. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity; and
  6. Support their ideas with evidence found in the works.

Extensions

  1. Have students research the Canadian Group of Seven, and analyse a work of art by their favorite member.
  2. Have students review colour theory using the poster available on this web site. Ask them to find examples of various colour schemes in the works of the Group of Seven. Next have them make small drawings of portions of the works in an alternate colour scheme, and to comment on how the changes affect the work.

Prepare

  1. Gather images by the Group of Seven.
    Group of Seven
  2. Gather photographs of the Canadian North
    Agawa
    Doe Lake
    Frontenac
    Watabeag River
  3. Prepare an area for the glue to dry.
  4. If possible visit an art gallery that has works by the Group of Seven. For example, 
    McMichael Gallery
    Art Gallery of Ontario 
    National Gallery of Canada          

Introduction

  1. View several Group of Seven paintings. Share some background information about the group.
    Group of Seven
    AGO Video
  2. Analyse a painting as a group.
  3. Make a list of characteristics seen in the works.
    trees
    - hills

    landscape
    warm and cool colours
    - large shapes

    simplified shapes
  4. Introduce the challenge.

    Activities

    The Challenge

    1. Draw a landscape that includes trees, hills, and bushes.
    2. Draw with glue to create line and texture on watercolour paper.
    3. Use analogous colours to add rich texture in your own painting.
    4. Use contrast and bold strokes of colour to create areas of emphasis in your composition.

    The Process

    1. Have students gather photos of landscapes from magazines, or ones they or a classmate may have taken.
    2. Encourage them to try to look at the landscapes through the eyes of one of the members of the Group of Seven. Ask them to choose several scenes to practice drawing in their sketchbooks.
    3. Have students choose one of the photographs to use for their painting. Remind them that it will be their interpretation of the scene in the style of the Group of Seven.
    4. Guide the students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
    5. Demonstrate how to use the various media as you move through the steps.
    6. Provide individual assistance and encouragement as needed.

    Sharing

    1. Display the completed paintings for a group discussion. Compare students' paintings with those of the Group of Seven.
      - How is the work like a Group of Seven painting?
      - Where do you see warm and cool colours?
      - How does the use of coloured pencils contribute to the work?

       

    Assessment

    1. Observe students as they work  – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting 
    2. Observe students as they discuss the art works – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience. (Download - LANDSCAPE_tracking.pdf)
    3. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Download - Landscape Painting.pdf)