MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour

Students use Crayola No-Run glue, watercolour paint and coloured pencils to create an original landscape painting inspired by the Canadian Group of Seven.

Required Time

180 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 7 to Grade 10

Subject

Social Studies
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

background cool colours foreground line middle ground texture warm colours

Materials

Crayola Watercolour Paints Crayola Coloured Pencils - 24 Count Crayola Marker & Watercolour Paper - 22.9 cm x 30.5 cm (9" x 12") Crayola Paint Brushes Crayola Washable No-Run Glue Water Containers Paper Towels

Shop Crayola Products

Steps

MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step One

Step One

  1. Select several photos to work with.
  2. Practice drawing the images in your sketchbook or on paper.
  3. Choose one sketch to use for your painting.
MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Use your chosen sketch as a guide.
  2. Draw the trees, hills and bushes with Crayola No-Run glue.
  3. Allow the glue to dry overnight.
MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Use warm and cool colours of watercolour paint to fill in the land and sky.
  2. Use complementary colours, for example, blue and orange. 
  3. Once the paint is dry, use coloured pencils to add detail to the landscape. 
  4. Choose a variety of each colour, for example, light, medium and dark blues.
MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Mix at least three analogous colours in each section to achieve rich textures.
MIXED MEDIA LANDSCAPE – Group of Seven, Colour - Step Five

Step Five

  1. Use contrast and bold strokes of colour to add emphasis.
  2. View your work from a distance to see it with fresh eyes.
    - How is it like a Group of Seven painting?
    - Where do you see warm and cool colours?
    - How does the use of coloured pencils contribute to the effectiveness of the work?
    - What do you like best about this work? Why?

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • identify characteristics of the works of the Group of Seven;
  • draw a landscape that expresses their own ideas in the style of the Group of Seven;
  • balance the composition by drawing lines with glue;
  • use contrast and bold strokes of colour to create areas of emphasis;
  • demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity; 
  • support their ideas with evidence found in the works.

Extensions

Have students:

  • review colour theory using the poster available on this web site;
  • find examples of various colour schemes in the works of the Group of Seven;
  • make small drawings of portions of the works in an alternate colour scheme;
  • comment on how the changes affect the work.

Prepare

  1. Gather and make available books about the Group of Seven such as The Group of Seven and Tom Thomson, by David Silcox; Meet the Group of Seven, by David Wistow, Kelly McKinley, and the Art Gallery of Ontario; The Group of Seven Reimagined: Contemporary Stories Inspired by Historic Canadian Paintings, by Karen Schauber; and The Group of Seven Postcard book, by Art Gallery of Ontario.
  2. Download and display the Colour poster available on this website.
  3. Introduce or review colour theory.
    - Complementary Colours - colours opposite each other on the colour wheel, e.g., blue and orange
    Warm Colours - red, yellow orange
    - Cool Colours - blue, violet, green
    - Analogous Colours - colours beside each other on the colour wheel
  4. Download photographs of the Canadian North from the Internet, e.g.,
    Agawa
    Tom Thomson
    Georgian Bay
    Cloud Bay
  5. Prepare an area for the glue to dry.
  6. If possible visit an art gallery that has works by the Group of Seven.
    McMichael Canadian Collection
    Art Gallery of Ontario 
    National Gallery of Canada  
        

Introduction

  1. View and discuss the AGO Video about the Group of Seven.
  2. View and analyse a painting as a group.
  3. Make a list of characteristics seen in the works.
    trees
    - hills

    landscape
    warm and cool colours
    - large shapes

    simplified shapes
  4. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Draw a landscape inspired by the Group of Seven that includes trees, hills, and bushes.
  2. Balance the composition by drawing lines with glue.
  3. Use placement of warm and cool colours to balance the composition
  4. Use analogous colours to add rich texture in your own painting.
  5. Use contrast and bold strokes of colour to create areas of emphasis in your composition.
  6. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students. For example,
    I know I am successful when I have:
    - created an original landscape inspired by the Group of Seven
    - included trees, hills and bushes in my landscape
    - balanced the composition by drawing lines with glue
    - used analogous colours to create rich texture
    - used contrast and bold strokes to create areas of emphasis
    - used placement of warm and cool colours to balance the composition
    - unified the design by repeating lines and patterns
    - kept the artwork in good condition
  3. Have students gather photos of landscapes from magazines, or ones they or a classmate may have taken.
  4. Encourage them to try to look at the landscapes through the eyes of one of the members of the Group of Seven.
  5. Ask them to choose several scenes to practice drawing in their sketchbooks.
  6. Have students choose one of the photographs to use for their painting.
  7. Remind them that it will be their interpretation of the scene in the style of the Group of Seven.
  8. Guide the students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  9. Demonstrate how to use the various media as you move through the steps.
  10. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Display the completed paintings as a body of work.
  2. Gather students for a group discussion. Compare students' paintings with those of the Group of Seven.
    How is the work like a Group of Seven painting?
    - How is it different?
    - How does the placement of warm and cool colours help to balance the composition?
    - How does the use of coloured pencils contribute to the work?
    - What is the most striking feature of the work? Why?

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting.
  2. Observe students as they discuss their artworks – speaks with a clear voice, looks at audience while speaking, points to areas in the artwork, provides accurate information, answers questions from the audience effectively.
  3. Observe students as they listen – looks at presenter, asks effective questions, supports ideas with evidence found in the artwork.
  4. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads - LandscapePainting_tracking.sheet.pdf)
  5. Have students reflect on their work in their sketchbooks/journals.
    - How is your painting like a Group of Seven painting?
    - How is it different than a Group of Seven painting?
    - How have you balanced the composition?
    - What surprised you about using mixed media to create an artwork?
    - What do you like best about your work? Why?
    - Based on your overall design what level do you think you achieved? 1  2  3  4