INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book

Students research the life and work of Emily Carr and use oil pastels to create a tunnel book highlighting one of her paintings.

Required Time

180 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 5 to Grade 9

Subject

Language Arts
Mathematics
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

accordion-fold background foreground middle ground space tunnel book

Materials

Oil Pastels Scissors White Glue Rulers Pencils Bristol Board - 50.8 cm x 76.2 cm (20" x 30")

Steps

INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step One

Step One

  1. Measure and cut out a piece of Bristol board 30.5 cm x 40.6 cm.
  2. Draw an X from one corner to the other. 
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Fold all 4 sides of the Bristol board into the centre of the X.
  2. Make sure the outer edge of the Bristol board lines up with the centre of the X.
  3. Make sure you fold all 4 sides into the X.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Unfold the Bristol board.
  2. Place it in the portrait (vertical) position.
  3. Mark a dot and small, vertical arrow at the intersection of each of the folds in the 4 corners. 
  4. Make sure the arrows are facing each other.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Cut along each crease in the direction of the arrow and stop at each dot. 
  2. There should be 4 cuts.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Five

Step Five

  1. Put lots of Washable glue all over the back of one of the corner rectangles. 
  2. Fold the side of the Bristol board up so it is at right angles to the middle of the Bristol board.
  3. Tuck the corner rectangle in so the bottom is lined up with the fold of the middle rectangle.
  4. Glue the corner rectangle to the middle rectangle.
  5. Repeat with the other corner rectangle to make the end of the box.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Six

Step Six

  1. Fold the top edge over.
  2. Place large paper clips along the flaps to hold the paper in place until the glue dries. 
  3. Repeat these steps for the other end of the box.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Seven

Step Seven

  1. Measure and cut out 2 pieces of Bristol board 15 cm x 16.5 cm.
  2. Place one piece on the desk with the 16.5 cm side at the top.
  3. Measure 1.5 cm intervals from one side to the other, parallel and close to the bottom of the paper.
  4. Measure matching 1.5 cm intervals along the top of the paper.
  5. Draw a straight line to connect every other dot.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Eight

Step Eight

  1. Repeat step 7 on the back of the paper.
  2. This time start with the opposite dot and draw a straight line to connect every other dot.
  3. On each side use the tip of a scissors to lightly score along the lines.
  4. Repeat this process with the other piece of Bristol board.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Nine

Step Nine

  1. Accordion fold the Bristol board on the scored lines.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Ten

Step Ten

  1. Use a marker to draw an outline around the foreground of the painting.
  2. Use oil pastels to draw this section of the painting on a 15 cm x 19 cm piece of cardstock paper.
  3. Cut out the foreground, and repeat this process for each section of the painting.
    - middle ground
    - background
    - sky
  4. Make sure you colour each section all the way down to the bottom of your paper.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Eleven

Step Eleven

  1. Glue the accordion papers into each side of the box.
  2. Glue the sky portion of your painting to the back of the box.
  3. Glue the background section to the accordion fold at the back.
  4. Glue the rest of the layers into the box, attaching them to a fold on the side.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Twelve

Step Twelve

  1. Measure and cut 2 pieces of Bristol board 15 cm x 27.7 cm.
  2. Place 1 piece on the desk with the 27.7 cm side at the top.
  3. Measure and draw a line 7.5 cm in from the short side.
  4. Score and fold along this line.
  5. Repeat this process for the other piece of paper.
  6. These will be the covers.
INSPIRED BY EMILY CARR – Canadian Artist, Tunnel Book - Step Thirteen

Step Thirteen

  1. Glue information about the artist and the painting on the covers.
  2. Glue the covers to the outside of the box.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  1. Create a tunnel book to present research about Emily Carr; 
  2. Use oil pastel techniques to imitate an Emily Carr painting;
  3. Interpret an Emily Carr painting;
  4. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity; and
  5. Support their ideas with evidence found in the works.

Extensions

Have students:

  1. Read excerpts from Emily Carr's journals and then write their own imaginary entry in the role of Emily Carr.
  2. Work with peers to create a short video based on their journal entry.
  3. Share and critique their videos in a student organized film festival.

Prepare

  1. Download images of Emily Carr's artwork from the Internet. 
    Odds and Ends
    Kitwancool
    Scorned as Timber
  2. Review, and share  with your students, some of the information about Emily Carr found on the Canadian Encyclopedia, Historica website.
    Canadian Encyclopedia
  3. Gather and make available books about Emily Carr, for example, Emily Carr: At the Edge of the World, by Jo Ellen Bogart; When Emily Carr Met Woo, by Monica Kulling; Emily Carr's Attic, by Diane Carmel Léger; Emily Carr and Her Dogs: Flirt, Punk and Loo, by Emily Carr; Emily Carr Collected, by Ian Thom; From the Forest to the Sea: Emily Carr in British Columbia, by Sarah Milroy and Ian Dejardin (Editors); and Hundreds and Thousands: The Journals of Emily Carr, by Emily Carr.
  4. Download the Space poster available on this website.
    Space

Introduction

  1. Display an Emily Carr painting.
  2. Ask students to look at the work closely for a minute without speaking, and then to:
    - Share first impressions of the painting, e.g., feelings, emotions, questions, connections.
    - Describe the painting, e.g., colours, lines, textures, shapes, and especially space - foreground, middle ground and background.
    - Discuss how the elements and principles of design contribute to the feelings and ideas expressed in the painting.
    - Interpret the painting, supporting their ideas with evidence found in the artwork.
    - Discuss why this might be considered an important work of art.
  3. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Create a tunnel book to present research about Emily Carr. 
  2. Use oil pastel techniques to imitate an Emily Carr painting.
  3. Interpret an Emily Carr painting.
  4. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.
  5. Support your ideas with evidence found in the works.

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    - oil pastel techniques look like Emily Carr's painting style
    - painting accurately shows foreground, middle ground, background and sky
    - tunnel book carefully measured
    - tunnel book carefully constructed
    - research includes 3 significant facts about Emily Carr
    - interpretation of painting is supported with evidence found in the artwork
    - finished artwork is in good condition
  3. Provide time for students to search for, and select an Emily Carr painting to research.
  4. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  5. Observe students as they work. 
  6. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Place students into small groups. 
  2. Ask them to: 
    - Share their work and discuss the things that are especially effective and why.
    - Talk about what they found satisfying about doing this project.
    - Talk about how they might use what they learned in a different way.
  3. Share ideas with the whole class. 
  4. Conduct a read-aloud of an excerpt from Hundreds and Thousands: The Journals of Emily Carr, by Emily Carr.
  5. Ask students to share their overall impression of Emily Carr and her place in Canadian history.
  6. Ask students to tell how they felt about doing this project.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work  – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting
  2. Observe students as they discuss the art works – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience.
  3. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads – Carr_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads – Carr_self-assessment.pdf)