ILLUSTRATING A STORY – Coloured Pencil Techniques, Repetition

Students examine the work of several illustrators, write their own story and use a variety of coloured pencil techniques to illustrate part of it.

Required Time

120 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 3 to Grade 8

Subject

Language Arts
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

colour composition contrast movement picture plane repetition

Materials

Coloured Pencils Drawing Paper Pencils Ball Point Pens Erasers

Steps

ILLUSTRATING A STORY – Coloured Pencil Techniques, Repetition - Step One

Step One

  1. Select the part of your story you want to illustrate.
  2. Make 4 thumbnail sketches of different ideas.
  3. Choose the idea you like the best.
ILLUSTRATING A STORY – Coloured Pencil Techniques, Repetition - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Use a pencil to draw the composition on a piece of paper.
  2. Remember to repeat lines and shapes.
  3. Check to see that your eye travels easily from one part of your drawing to another.
ILLUSTRATING A STORY – Coloured Pencil Techniques, Repetition - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Paper clip your drawing to your good paper.
  2. Trace over the details using a ball point pen.
  3. Press hard to make impressed lines on the good paper.
ILLUSTRATING A STORY – Coloured Pencil Techniques, Repetition - Step Four

Step Four

  1. You used the impressed line technique to prepare your drawing.
  2. Use at least 4 other coloured pencil techniques to colour the drawing.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • use 5 different coloured pencil techniques;
  • create a coloured pencil illustration for a story they have written;
  • use repetition of shape and colour to move the viewer's eye through the picture;
  • demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

Extensions

Have students:

  • create a bound book of their story using the Creating a Simple Bound Book lesson plan available on this website;
  • illustrate key parts of the story using coloured pencil techniques;
  • share their books with their peers.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson have students learn a variety of coloured pencil techniques using the Exploring Coloured Pencils lesson plan available on this website.
  2. Gather and make available a variety of picture books, for example, Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears, by Verna Aardema; The Arrival, by Shaun Tan; Love From Grandma, by Jane Tanner; Flight of the Honey Bee, by Raymond Huber and Brian Lovelock; Fox, by Ron Brooks; and The Very Cranky Bear, by Nick Bland.
  3. Download and display the Repetition and Colour posters available on this website.
  4. Have students work in pairs to analyse a story they are reading focusing on the elements of storytelling, for example,
    - storyline - beginning, middle and end
    - main character, and supporting characters
    - conflict and resolution
  5. Have students work in pairs to analyse illustrations in a variety of picture books focusing on the elements of visual presentation, for example,
    - use of the elements of design
    - how the eye moves through the picture plane 
    - framing images
    - background/setting details
    - depiction of characters/drawing style
    - integration of images and text
    - layout - overall design of the page
  6. Provide sufficient time for students to write a short story.

Introduction

  1. Read the text from one page of a picture book.
  2. View the illustration that accompanies the text and list all the things the illustrator has shown.
  3. Discuss how the illustration uses the art elements and media techniques to extend the meaning of the text.
  4. Ask students to think about how they can extend the meaning of their story with pictures.
  5. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Use 5 different coloured pencil techniques.
  2. Create a coloured pencil illustration for one part of your story.
  3. Use repetition of shape and colour to move the viewer's eye through the picture plane.
  4. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students. For example,
    I know I am successful when I have:
    - created an illustration that uses details to extend the meaning of my story
    - repeated shapes and colours
    - created a composition that 
    moves the viewer's eye through the picture plane
    - used 5 different coloured pencil techniques
    - kept the paper in good condition
  3. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  4. Observe students as they work. 
  5. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Place students into small groups.
  2. Ask them to take turns reading the text that accompanies their illustration, and discussing how the illustration extends the meaning of the text.
  3. During the discussion include references to:
    - composition - use of repetition to move the eye through the picture plane
    - details - things that add to their understanding of the text

    - textures – that have been created using different coloured pencil techniques
    colour – how it has been used to balance the composition and show depth
    feelings the works evoke
    challenges they may have had and how they solved them
  4. Ask them to tell how they felt about doing this project.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting
  2. Observe students as they discuss the illustrations – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience.
  3. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads - Illustration_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads - Illustration_self-assessment.pdf, or IllustrationPrimary_self-assessment.pdf)