GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star

Students create a geometric design using a circle divided into ten equal parts and colour it with metallic coloured pencils.

Required Time

80 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 5 to Grade 8

Subject

Language Arts
Mathematics
Social Studies
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

contrast decagon decagram pentagon pentagram shape

Materials

Metallic Coloured Pencils Glitter Glue Pencils Rulers Erasers Black Foam Core Board - 12.7 cm x 12.7 cm (5" x 5") - one per student Ball Headed Straight Pins - one per student

Steps

GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step One

Step One

  1. Use the pattern available in the downloads section of this lesson plan. (Downloads – CircleTenParts.pdf)
  2. Cut out the pattern so you can easily centre it on your tile.
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Centre the pattern on the tile and hold it firmly in place.
    You may want to place a small piece of tape on each corner to keep it from moving.
  2. Use one straight pin to push a small hole through each dot on the pattern.
  3. There should be 10 holes.
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Three

Step Three

CONSTRUCTION LINES – Drawing the Decagram Grid

  1. Use a pencil to connect the dots in the following way:
    - start at a dot
    - count to the 4th dot
    - draw a line from the starting dot to that dot
    - repeat this until all the dots have been used
    - it should be a 10 pointed star
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Use a pencil to connect the dots in the following way:
    - start at a dot
    - count to the 3rd dot
    - draw a line from the starting dot to that dot
    - repeat this until all the dots have been used
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Five

Step Five

  1. Look for this polygon.
  2. Outline it.
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Six

Step Six

  1. Find the same polygon all the way around the decagram grid.
  2. There should be 10 altogether.
  3. They overlap.
  4. Outline them all.
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Seven

Step Seven

  1. Find the small polygons that connect the shapes formed by two overlapping polygons.
  2. Outline them all around the grid. 
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Eight

Step Eight

  1. Erase the decagram grid construction lines.
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Nine

Step Nine

  1. Test the colours on the back of your tile.
  2. Choose colours you want to work with to colour your design.
GEOMETRIC PATTERNS – Islamic Design, Interlaced Ten-Pointed Star - Step Ten

Step Ten

  1. Colour your design with contrasting metallic colours.
  2. Do not press too hard or you will stretch the paper.
  3.  Keep colouring soft layers of colour, one on top of the other in different directions until you build up lots of colour.
  4. Add glitter glue details to create contrast and emphasis.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • create a decagram grid; 
  • create the interlaced ten-pointed star geometric pattern;
  • use colour to create contrast; 
  • demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity;  
  • support their ideas with evidence found in the works.

Extensions

Have students:

  • research geometric design in Islamic art and create a presentation to share with their peers;
  • create a video demonstrating how to divide a circle into 10 equal parts;
  • teach a peer how to make the interlaced ten-pointed star.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson have students practice drawing the decagram grid and creating the interlaced 10-pointed star. (Downloads – InterlacedTen-PointedStar.pdf)
  2. Download and display the Shape, Colour and Contrast Posters available on this website.
  3. Download Islamic geometric patterns from the Internet, for example,
    Islamic Tiles-Germany
    Louvre
    Khomeini Mosque
    Samarkand
    Islamic Miniature Painting
  4. Review the background information about Islamic art and geometric design available from the MET website.
    Islamic Art and Geometric Design
  5. Gather and make available books about Islamic design, for example, The Illustrated Guide to Islam: History, philosophy, traditions, teachings, art and architecture, with 1000 pictures, by Raana Bokhari, and‎ Dr. Mohammad Seddon; Mosque, by David Macaulay; Islamic Geometric Patterns, by Eric Broug; Islamic Design Workbook, by Eric Broug; and Islamic Designs for Artists and Craftspeople, by Eva Wilson.
  6. Download and copy the circle divided into ten parts template enough for one per student. (Downloads – CircleTenParts.pdf)

 

Introduction

  1. View and discuss the geometric patterns in Samarkand.
    Point out things such as:
    - colour combinations 
    - use of line and contrast
    - 10 pointed star
    - bowtie pattern at top and bottom of the 10-pointed star – this shape is created because regular decagons cannot tessellate and in order to fill the flat surface without gaps the shape has to be incorporated into the overall design
    - use of decorative patterns to fill the geometric shapes
  2. Share some information about the use of geometric patterns in Islamic art, for example,
    - Islamic art has 3 key characteristics – calligraphy using Arabic script; geometric pattern with interwoven designs and the arabesque or idealized plant forms
    - artists took geometric ideas from the ancient Greeks and Romans and created a whole new style 
    - the ideas and work of Islamic mathematicians, astronomers, and scientists were part of this unique new style
    - basic shapes are combined to create geometric patterns that can be repeated, interlaced, and arranged in intricate combinations
    - in Islamic art 4 basic shapes are used to create more complicated patterns – circles; squares or four-sided polygons; triangles; and multisided polygons.
  3. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Create a decagram grid. 
  2. Create the interlaced ten-pointed star geometric pattern.
  3. Use colour to create contrast. 
  4. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.
  5. Support your ideas with evidence found in the works.

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    I know I am successful when I:
    - accurately draw the decagram grid
    - accurately outline the shapes for the ten-pointed interlaced star
    - apply colour smoothly without stretching the paper
    - create contrast with different colours
    - make sure the finished artwork is in good condition
  3. Provide each student with a copy of the circle divided into ten parts template. (Downloads – CircleTenParts.pdf)
  4. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  5. Observe students as they work. 
  6. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Place students into small groups. 
  2. Ask them to share their work and discuss the things that are especially effective and why.
  3. Share ideas with the whole class. 
  4. Ask students to tell how they felt about doing this project.
  5. Have students:
    - work together to tessellate all the tiles in one group show
    - write a review of the group display that includes, description; analysis; and evaluation
     
     

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting
  2. Observe students as they discuss the tiles – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience.
  3. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads – Ten-PointedStar_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads – Ten-PointedStar_self-assessment.pdf)