FRAMING IMAGES – Types of Camera Shots

Students use coloured pencils and fine line markers to illustrate 7 basic camera shots used to frame images in motion and still photography.

Required Time

160 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 7 to Grade 12

Subject

Language Arts
Visual Arts
Media Literacy

Vocabulary

camera shots crop elements of design principles of design rule of thirds

Materials

Coloured Pencils Fine Line Markers Photographs Cardstock Paper Scissors

Steps

FRAMING IMAGES – Types of Camera Shots - Step One

Step One

LONG SHOT

  1. Find a photograph that frames a figure using a long shot.
    - The subject is cropped just above the head and just below the feet.
  2. Cut out 2 L-shaped pieces of cardstock, width about 2.5 cm, to use as a viewfinder.
  3. Draw this image in the Long Shot space of the handout.

 

*Image – By kinnigurl - Luongo, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9617943

 

FRAMING IMAGES – Types of Camera Shots - Step Two

Step Two

MEDIUM SHOT

  1. Use the viewfinder to crop the image in a medium shot.
    - Make sure the frame is landscape.
    - Crop the subject just above the head and just below the waist.
  2. This shot shows part of the subject in more detail.
  3. Draw this image in the Medium Shot space of the handout.

 

*Image – By kinnigurl - Luongo, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9617943

FRAMING IMAGES – Types of Camera Shots - Step Three

Step Three

CLOSE-UP SHOT

  1. Use the viewfinder to crop the image in a close-up shot.
    - Make sure the frame is landscape.
    - Crop the subject at, or just below the top of the head and just below the shoulders.
  2. This shot shows a specific part of the subject, usually the face, and takes up the whole frame.
  3. Draw this image in the Close-Up Shot space of the handout.

 

*Image – By kinnigurl - Luongo, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9617943

FRAMING IMAGES – Types of Camera Shots - Step Four

Step Four

EXTREME CLOSE-UP SHOT

  1. Use the viewfinder to crop the image in an extreme close-up shot.
    - Make sure the frame is landscape.
    - Crop the subject just above the eyebrows and just below the eyes.
  2. This shot is often used to show emotion.
  3. Draw this image in the Extreme Close-Up Shot space of the handout.

 

*Image – By kinnigurl - Luongo, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9617943

FRAMING IMAGES – Types of Camera Shots - Step Five

Step Five

ESTABLISHING SHOT

  1. Use your imagination to create the establishing shot for your photograph.
    - Make sure the frame is landscape.
    - The whole body is in the shot and the viewer can easily identify the environment.
    - A sense of the environment/location should help tell a story.
  2. This shot sets the scene.
  3. Find new photographs to help you complete the remaining frames in the worksheet.

 

 

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  1. Illustrate 7 basic frames used in motion and still photography;
  2. Explain how framing is used in order to tell a story; and
  3. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

 

Extensions

Have students:

  1. Replicate the frames using a digital device.
  2. View appropriate films as a class, first with the sound off, then with it on.
  3. Discuss the types of camera angles and shots used in the film.
  4. Use critical thinking, bringing together existing knowledge and new understandings, to explain how shot sequences help to tell the story visually. 
  5. Support their ideas with evidence found in the films.

Prepare

  1. Ask students to find and bring to class several images from the Internet or magazines that interest them, making sure that each photograph tells a story without advertisement or words. 
  2. Review the principles and elements of design.
  3. Review the rule of thirds.
  4. You may want to have students complete the Coloured Pencil Techniques worksheet available on this website.
    Coloured Pencil Techniques
  5. Download camera angle images from the Internet, for example,
    Establishing Shot
    Long Shot
    Medium Shot
    Close-Up
    Extreme Close-Up
    Low Angle
    High Angle
  6. Photocopy the Framing Images worksheet, enough for one for each student. (Downloads – Framing_Shots.pdf)

Introduction

  1. View the camera angle images and discuss them paying particular attention to the framing of the dominate element. 
  2. Guide students to notice how the dominant element for each shot is being composed concentrating on the top of the frame and the bottom of frame.
  3. Discuss how using the rule of thirds can help the photographer compose an image.
    - It helps create a sense of balance without being too static.
    - It makes an image seem more complex without being too busy.
    - It adds variety and interest to the image by creating a dominant element.
  4. Ask students to work in small groups to sort their images according to types of shots, and then to display them in categories on their desks.
  5. Have students do a quick walk about to view the images/categories, and discuss choices made by each other.
  6. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Use coloured pencils and fine line markers to illustrate 7 basic frames used in motion and still photography.
  2. Explain how framing is used in order to tell a story.
  3. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

The Process

  1. Ensure that everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students. For example,
    accurate illustration of each camera shot
    - coloured pencil techniques are used to create contrast and detail
    - paper is in good condition
  3. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  4. Observe students as they work. 
  5. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Once the drawings are complete ask students to share them in small groups.
    Ask them to:
    - Look closely at the images and determine whether they fit the requirements for each frame.
    - Share thoughts and opinions about what works and what can be improved.
    - Talk about how they might use this information in other projects.
  2. Ask some of the students to share their ideas with the whole class.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – attention to detail, transfer of knowledge from lesson to activity, collaboration with classmates
  2. Observe students as they discuss their work – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the work and from personal experience.
  3. Use checklist to track progress. (Downloads – FramingImages_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads – FramingImages_self-assessment.pdf)