FINE LINE MARKER DRAWING – Line, Value, Repetition

Students research an endangered species of their choice and use a black fine line marker to create a drawing that shows the animal doing several different things.

Required Time

120 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 7 to Grade 8

Subject

Language Arts
Science
Social Studies
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

Materials

Crayola Fine Line Markers - Black Crayola Marker & Watercolour Paper - 22.9 cm x 30.5 cm Crayola Sketchbooks - 1 per student Pencils Erasers

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Steps

FINE LINE MARKER DRAWING – Line, Value, Repetition - Step One

Step One

  1. Choose an endangered animal to research.
  2. Collect pictures of the animal in its natural habitat.
  3. Make notes of the kinds of things it does.
  4. Draw sketches of the animal doing several different things.
  5. Imagine how you will combine all this information in one composition. 
  6. Make a plan drawing.
FINE LINE MARKER DRAWING – Line, Value, Repetition - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Draw your composition lightly with pencil.
  2. Make sure the composition moves your eye through the picture plane.
  3. Include details that show the habitat and activities of the animal.
FINE LINE MARKER DRAWING – Line, Value, Repetition - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Use a black fine line marker to draw over the pencil lines. 
  2. Add lines and dots to show details and create shadows.
  3. Once you are satisfied with your drawing, gently erase the pencil lines.
  4. View the drawing with fresh eyes.
    - What does your picture communicate about your animal?
    - How have you shown texture and shading?
    - How does your eye travel through the picture plane?
    - What details provide special interest to the viewer?
    - What do you like best about your drawing? Why?

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • identify key characteristics and habitat of an endangered animal;
  • use repetition of elements to create a range of values; 
  • create a composition that moves the viewer's eye through the picture plane;
  • create a black fine line marker drawing that shows an animal doing several different things;
  • demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

Extensions

Have students:

  • create a graphic story about the plight of their animal from the animal's point of view using the Graphic Story lesson plan available on this website;
  • present their work to the class.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson you may want to have students complete steps 1 - 6 of the Exploring Coloured Pencils worksheet - substituting black fine line marker for pencil.
  2. Download images of line drawings from the Internet, for example,
    Cross Hatching
    Hatching
    Stipple
    Cat
    Jefferys
  3. Download and display the Repetition, Line, and Value posters available on this website.
  4. Provide time for students to choose and research an endangered species.

Introduction

  1. View and discuss the Jefferys image drawing attention to the different ways line, pattern, contrast and value have been used.
  2. Discuss how value can be used to create contrast and depth in a drawing.
    - the placement of contrasting elements in the composition leads the viewer's eye through the picture plane
  3. View and discuss several images focussing on the kinds of lines and marks used
  4. Use a black fine line marker to demonstrate how the pressure changes the overall effect of different techniques such as hatching and crosshatching.
    - the greater the pressure the thicker the lines
    - the closer the lines are together the darker the value
  5. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Identify key characteristics and habitat of an endangered animal.
  2. Use repetition and weight of lines and dots to create a range of values.
  3. Create a composition that moves the viewer's eye through the picture plane.
  4. Create a black fine line marker drawing that shows an animal doing several different things.
  5. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    I know I am successful when I have:
    - explored ideas in my sketchbook
    - made and used a planning drawing
    - used different kinds of lines and dots
    drawn lines and dots close together to show dark areas
    - drawn lines and dots far apart to show light areas
    - drawn details that show characteristics of the animal
    - drawn an animal doing several different things
    - used contrast to move the eye through the composition
    - kept the paper is in good condition
  3. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  4. Observe students as they work. 
  5. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Place students into small groups. 
  2. Ask them to share their work and discuss the things that are especially effective and why.
    - What does the picture communicate about the animal?
    - How has the artist shown texture and shading?
    - How does your eye travel through the picture plane?
    - What details provide special interest to the viewer?
    - What do you like best about the drawing? Why?
  3. Share ideas with the whole class. 
  4. Ask students to share what they learned about drawing by doing this drawing.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting.
  2. Observe students as they discuss their drawings – speaks with a clear voice, looks at audience while speaking, points to areas in the drawing, provides accurate information, answers questions from the audience effectively.
  3. Observe students as they listen – looks at presenter, asks effective questions, supports ideas with evidence found in the artwork.
  4. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads - Drawing_tracking.pdf)
  5. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads - Drawing_self-assessment.pdf)