COMPARE AND CONTRAST COLOUR SCHEMES – Colour Relationships

Students digitize a line drawing they created in another class, and use a photo editing program such as Photoshop to create several new versions with different colour schemes. Then they write a compare-and-contrast analysis of 2 of the new versions in order to evaluate their effectiveness in communicating a message.

 

 

Required Time

80 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 7 to Grade 9

Subject

Language Arts
Visual Arts
Media Literacy

Vocabulary

brightness colour scheme intensity photo editing

Materials

Crayola Sketchbooks - 1 per student Crayola Coloured Pencils - 24 Count Crayola Markers - 24 Count

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Steps

COMPARE AND CONTRAST COLOUR SCHEMES – Colour  Relationships - Step One

Step One

  1. Download the Colour Wheel poster. (Downloads - ColourWheel.pdf)
  2. Resize and print it.
  3. Glue it into your sketchbook.
  4. Play with different colour schemes using coloured pencils or markers.
    - Think about the meaning the colours you choose might communicate when used in your design. (Downloads - CulturalColour.pdf)
  5. Choose the ones that work the best.
COMPARE AND CONTRAST COLOUR SCHEMES – Colour  Relationships - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Follow the steps in your photo editing program to add colour to your drawing.
    - See the Photoshop Basics lesson plan available on this website.
COMPARE AND CONTRAST COLOUR SCHEMES – Colour  Relationships - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Think about the message  you want to communicate.
  2. Make several versions with different colour schemes.
  3. Choose 2 to compare.
COMPARE AND CONTRAST COLOUR SCHEMES – Colour  Relationships - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Write a compare-and-contrast analysis of the 2 drawings to evaluate how effective the colour schemes are in communicating your message.
  2. Decide if you are going to contrast the drawings, compare the drawings or do both.
    - State the message you intended to communicate.
    - Contrast the 2 colour schemes using phrases such as – one difference; another difference; in contrast.
    - Compare the 2 colour schemes using phrases such as – one way they are similar; another way they are similar; in a similar way.
    - Write a summary statement to show which of the 2 colour schemes you feel is most effective in conveying your message.

Learning Goals

Student will be able to:

  • digitize a line drawing they have created;
  • use a photo editing program to add colour to their digitized drawing;
  • create several new versions of their drawing using different colour schemes;
  • write a compare-and-contrast analysis of 2 of the new versions.

Extensions

Have students:

  • work with a partner to create an instructional video to teach others some aspect of their process, e.g.,
    - digitizing a drawing;
    - using a photo editing program to add colour to a digital image;
    - writing a compare-and-contrast analysis.
  • share their videos with their peers.

Prepare

  1. Prior to this lesson
    - use the Photoshop Basics lesson plan available on this website to teach or review how to digitize and add colour to a line drawing. 
    - use the Colour Around The World lesson plan available on this website to teach or review about the possible meanings of colour. 
  2. Review or teach colour schemes.
  3. Download and display the Colour poster available on this website.
  4. Have students create a black and white line drawing, e.g., using the Environmental Word Art  lesson plan available on this website.
  5. Review/teach how to write a compare-and-contrast analysis, including the use of transitional expressions, e.g.,
    Compare - in the same way, also, similarly; in addition; one way they are similar; another way they are similar; in a similar way; 
    Contrast - one difference; another difference; on the other hand; although, however, unlike, in contrast

Introduction

  1. Ask students to share what they know about colour schemes, e.g.,
    - a group of colours chosen to achieve a desired effect
    - monochromatic - shades, tints and tones of the same hue
    - analogous - colours that are next to each other on the colour wheel
    - complementary - 2 colours that are opposite each other on the colour wheel
    - triad - 3 colours that are equidistant from each other on the colour wheel
    - split-complementary - 2 colours that are opposite each other on the colour wheel, as well as the colours immediately beside them
  2. View and discuss the effects of colour in several images.
  3. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Digitize your line drawing.
  2. Use a photo editing program to add colour to your digitized drawing.
  3. Create several new versions of your drawing using different colour schemes.
  4. Write a compare-and-contrast analysis of 2 of the new versions.

The Process

  1. Ensure that everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    I know I am successful when I have:
    digitized a line drawing
    - used a photo editing program to add colour to the image
    - created several new versions of the drawing using different colour schemes
    - saved the digital images throughout the process
    - written a compare-and-contrast analysis of 2 of the new versions
    - used transitional expressions in my analysis
    - explained why one version of the drawing communicates a stronger message than the other
  3. Review the Photoshop tool bar icons specifically the Paint Bucket, Foreground/ Background Colour and Colour Picker.
  4. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  5. Observe students as they work.
  6. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Place students into small groups. 
  2. Ask them to take turns sharing their work and discussing: 
    - what the designer intended to communicate;
    - how the colour schemes contribute to the message;

    - which colour scheme is most effective and why.
  3. Share ideas with the whole class. 
  4. Ask students to share what they learned about communication by doing this project.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting.
  2. Observe students as they discuss their drawings – speaks with a clear voice, looks at audience while speaking, points to areas in the drawing, provides accurate information, answers questions from the audience effectively.
  3. Observe students as they listen – looks at presenter, asks effective questions, supports ideas with evidence found in the artwork.
  4. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads - ColourSchemes_tracking.pdf)
  5. Have students use the self-assessment form to reflect on their work. (Downloads - ColourSchemes_self-assessment.pdf)