CANADIAN ART STAMPS – Presenting Research

Students research a Canadian artist inspired by a postage stamp from the Canadian Art collection and present their findings in a character book they create that contains both written text and visual information.

Required Time

160 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 7 to Grade 9

Subject

Language Arts
Social Studies
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

contrast design detail elements of art

Materials

Crayola Construction Paper Crayola Glue Sticks Crayola Scissors Crayola Glue Sticks Crayola Construction Crayons or Tempera Paint Crayola Paint Brushes - if using tempera paint Crayola Markers

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Steps

CANADIAN ART STAMPS – Presenting Research - Step One

Step One

  1. Fold the construction paper into 8 sections.
  2. Cut out the 2 lower, outside rectangles.
  3. Set the 2 small rectangles aside to use for the arms.
CANADIAN ART STAMPS – Presenting Research - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Cut the arms out of the small rectangles.
  2. Fold the top outer rectangles into the centre fold to make the jacket.
  3. Fold the top corners in on an angle to make the lapels.
CANADIAN ART STAMPS – Presenting Research - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Fold the jacket flaps in.
  2. Place the paper, jacket flaps down, on the desk.
  3. Glue the arms to the back, close to the top of the paper.
  4. Turn the paper over and check to see that the arms are attached at the shoulders. 
CANADIAN ART STAMPS – Presenting Research - Step Four

Step Four

SKIRT

  1. Fold the paper in half lengthwise.
  2. Cut along the outside edge as shown.
  3. Stop where the jacket begins.
CANADIAN ART STAMPS – Presenting Research - Step Five

Step Five

PANTS

  1. Fold the paper in half lengthwise.
  2. Cut along both lower edges as shown.
  3. Stop where the jacket begins.
CANADIAN ART STAMPS – Presenting Research - Step Six

Step Six

  1. Cut out head, hands and feet from the cardstock paper and glue them into place.
  2. Use Crayola construction paper crayons to colour the figure.
  3. Apply a heavy coat of crayon.
  4. Make a design that reflects the artist's work.
  5. Polish the crayon with a soft tissue.
CANADIAN ART STAMPS – Presenting Research - Step Seven

Step Seven

  1. Glue your finished research inside the jacket.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  • construct a character book that looks like a specific artist;
  • create visual details that communicate information about the artist and the art;
  • gather Information using a variety of print and electronic resources; 
  • publish a finished work that supports their ideas with researched evidence.

Extensions

Have students:

  • imagine they are a famous Canadian;
  • design a stamp to commemorate their achievements;
  • write a report to be filed (hypothetically), along with the stamp design, on the Canada Post website;
  • share their work with others. 

Prepare

  1. Visit the website Canada Post
    - choose Search All Stamps 
    - click in search by text 
    - type in Canadian art
    - browse the list of stamps
    - click on a stamp to learn more about it
  2. Provide time for students to select an artist and conduct their research.
    - Demonstrate how to access the website and search for an artist.
    - Select one stamp representing a visual artist to research, Emily Carr, for example.
    - Click
    on the stamp to learn more about it
    - Do a Google search for ‘Emily Carr self-images’. Select a self-portrait (or portrait) of her.
    - Discuss the details found in this self-portrait. What do they tell us about the artist? What are ‘key’ details? Why?
    - Discuss how students should gather visual information to communicate information about the artist and his/her work.
  3. Make 2 sample character books – 1 as shown in the steps so the figure is short and squat, and 1 folding the paper in the opposite direction so the figure is tall and thin.

Introduction

  1. Show your sample character books.
  2. Discuss what visual details are necessary to communicate information about the artist and his/her work.
    - face looks like the artist
    - hair style and clothing are similar to what the artist might have worn
    - design on clothing shows details of one or more of the artist's artworks
    - one or more copies of the postage stamp featuring the artist is included in the design
  3. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Create a character book to represent your artist.
  2. Include key details and design motifs that communicate ideas about the artist and his/her style.
  3. Include your researched material that answers the question, 'Why is this artist’s work on a Canadian stamp?'
  4. Support your ideas with evidence found in your research.
  5. Demonstrate creativity and technical accomplishment.

The Process

  1. Ensure that students understand the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    I know I am successful when I have:
    - constructed the book with care
    - added design motifs that communicate ideas about the artist's work
    - added key details that communicate ideas about the artist
    - made a face that is recognizable as the artist when compared to a portrait or photograph of the artist
    - included researched material that supports my ideas about why this artist's work is on a Canadian stamp
    - kept the work in good condition
  3. Guide students through the steps outlined in the lesson plan.
  4. Observe students as they work.
  5. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Place students into partners. Provide time for them to read and discuss each other’s work.
  2. Ask students to share with the whole class.:
    - something they learned about the artist
    - one interesting thing they noticed about the construction of the book 
  3. Display the books as a body of work.
  4. In a subsequent Language Arts class have students write a response to one of their peer's work.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting.
  2. Observe students as they discuss their books – speaks with a clear voice, looks at audience while speaking, holds book to the side, provides accurate information, answers questions from the audience effectively.
  3. Observe students as they listen – looks at presenter, asks effective questions, supports ideas with evidence found in the artwork.
  4. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads - CanadianArtStamp_tracking.pdf)
  5. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads - CanadianArtStamp_self-assessment.pdf )