CANADA’S MAPLE TREES – Contrast, Colour, Research

Students create a multi-fold book in the shape of a tree to present their research on ten different Canadian maple trees.

Required Time

180 Minutes

Grade Level

Grade 3 to Grade 6

Subject

Language Arts
Mathematics
Science
Visual Arts

Vocabulary

accordion-fold colour contrast crown line trunk

Materials

Drawing Paper 22.9 cm x 30.5 cm (9" x 12") Construction Paper - Assorted Colours Crayons Fine Line Markers Glue Sticks Scissors Rulers

Steps

CANADA’S MAPLE TREES – Contrast, Colour, Research - Step One

Step One

  1. Measure in 10 cm from the short end of the paper.
  2. Lightly draw a line through the 10 cm mark and parallel to the short end of the paper.
  3. Fold the paper along that line.
  4. Accordion fold the rest of the paper so that each fold is the same size as the first one.
  5. Repeat this on 2 more papers.
CANADA’S MAPLE TREES – Contrast, Colour, Research - Step Two

Step Two

  1. Glue the papers together overlapping the end sections of each paper.
CANADA’S MAPLE TREES – Contrast, Colour, Research - Step Three

Step Three

  1. Accordion fold the glued papers.
  2. Make sure all the edges line up.
CANADA’S MAPLE TREES – Contrast, Colour, Research - Step Four

Step Four

  1. Cut one section off the end of the folded paper.
  2. There should be 11 sections left.
CANADA’S MAPLE TREES – Contrast, Colour, Research - Step Five

Step Five

  1. Measure 10 cm up from the bottom of the folded paper. 
  2. Draw a line through the 10 cm mark and parallel to the short end of the folded paper.
  3. Measure in 2 cm from both ends of the line and mark the spots.
  4. Start the trunk of your tree at the 2 cm spots.
  5. Draw the trunk about half way up the paper then draw the crown of the tree.
  6. Make sure you leave enough of the folds on the sides of the tree crown to hold the pages together when it is opened.
  7. Cut away the negative shapes from the tree drawing.
CANADA’S MAPLE TREES – Contrast, Colour, Research - Step Six

Step Six

  1. Use construction paper to make a cover for the front and back of the book.
  2. Use a separate page for each tree. 
  3. Include:
    - the name of tree
    - a drawing of its leaf
    - written information about the tree
  4. Use the front and back of the book.
  5. There should be 10 different maple trees.

Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  1. Research 10 Canadian maple trees;
  2. Create a multi-fold book to present their research;
  3. Draw the leaf of each tree;
  4. Use colour and line to create contrast;
  5. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity; and
  6. Support their ideas with evidence found in the works.

Extensions

Have students:

  1. Create a diorama of a setting that includes maple trees and demonstrates how they are used.
  2. Share their work with their peers explaining what they have learned about a particular maple tree and its importance to the Canadian economy and culture.

Prepare

  1. Gather and make available books about Canadian maple trees, for example, Maple Trees, by Marcia S. Freeman; From Seed to Maple Tree: Following the Life Cycle, by Laura Purdie Salas; The Anxious Leaf: The Classic Story - Picture Book, by Henry Ward Beecher; A Kid's Guide to Maple Tapping: Let's Make Maple Syrup, by Julie Fryer; Maple Syrup: The Science of a Forest Treasure, by Michael Rechlin; From Maple Trees to Maple Syrup Library, by Kristin Thoennes Keller; The First Red Maple Leaf, by Ludmila Zeman; Maple Trees, by Rebecca Stromstad Glaser.
  2. Provide time for students to read the books and share information with each other.
  3. Download and display the Elements of Art posters available on this website.
    Posters
  4. Review, or introduce the idea of contrast by showing some examples of colour and line contrast.
  5. Prepare a partially completed example of the book. 

Introduction

  1. Have students share some of the information they have found about maple trees in Canada.
  2. Show students your sample book.
  3. Introduce the challenge.

Activities

The Challenge

  1. Research 10 Canadian maple trees.
  2. Create a multi-fold book to present your research.
  3. Draw the leaf of each tree.
  4. Use colour and line to create contrast.
  5. Demonstrate technical accomplishment and creativity.
  6. Support your ideas with evidence found in the works.

The Process

  1. Make sure everyone understands the challenge.
  2. Establish success criteria with your students, for example,
    - accurate measuring
    - careful folding
    - careful cutting
    - includes 10 different maple trees
    - includes an accurate drawing of each maple leaf
    - effective use of line and colour
    - effective use of contrast
    - attention to detail
    - paper in good condition
  3. Guide students through the steps outlined in this lesson plan.
  4. Observe students as they work. 
  5. Provide individual assistance and encouragement.

Sharing

  1. Place students into small groups. 
  2. Ask them to: 
    - Share their work and discuss the things learned about maple trees in Canada.
    - Discuss the things that are especially effective in the design of the multi-fold books and why.

    - Talk about what they found difficult and what they found easy to do.
  3. Share ideas with the whole class. 
  4. Ask students to tell how they felt about doing this project.

Assessment

  1. Observe students as they work  – thoughtful focus, discriminating, seeking more information, elaborating, experimenting
  2. Observe students as they discuss the art works – active listening, insightful contributions, supporting ideas with evidence found in the artwork and from personal experience.
  3. Use a checklist to track progress. (Downloads – Maples_tracking.pdf)
  4. Have students use the self-assessment form to evaluate their work. (Downloads – Maples_self-assessment.pdf)